DISTURBING RARITY REALITY!


http://wereblog.com/12-year-old-boy-with-a-rare-condition-with-his-head-hang-180-degrees

This is one of the reasons why my blog, Special Persons are People, Too! got conceived.

It’s not much really as I have failed to maintain it thinking it was a futile attempt at publicizing what my thoughts were regarding things, other special persons, and my pathetic quest to know more about my congenital defect. I did not have the absolute clarity as to the purpose of my putting up a blog. I felt it was useless; and my thoughts were: ‘Who am kidding? What in the world was I thinking putting up a blog nobody wants to read? To think I’m not an accomplished writer! Who cares about things like this?’

After several years of hiatus, I finally found better motivations not only to keep my blog afloat, but above all, to make something out of it as an instrument in service of humanity. On top of writing and sharing my thoughts and that of others’, I shall try to promote better understanding and awareness about us as God’s special creatures, to disseminate information as to the legitimacy and morality of our rlghts and privileges as also members of the society who ought not to be discriminated, oppressed, persecuted, looked down upon, bullied, and deprived of our basic needs having been borne to a society that should respect and celebrate those who are ‘slightly different’. It’s gonna be one tough journey; but we all have to start somewhere.

I pray for wisdom and resources for whatever purpose The Universe has drafted and designed for me.

MY FRIEND LYLE


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My friend Lyle was born male. Named John Kyle Tutor, she said she just coined her nickname that way to make it sound like her other boy name. She had always been effeminate and her choice of gender was highly respected by everyone in her family.  She says she is very lucky for having the kind of family she has because, compared with others just like her, her choice was never doubted;  they just accepted her decision with not much ado.

Outside of her clan, however, was a different story.  Although her home life has been happy and easy, in the real world was the exact opposite. Not only was she mocked for being a member of the third sex; she was, worst of all, constantly bullied  for walking with a limp.

When she was yet a toddler, she was in the care of an aunt when Lyle was diagnosed with poliomyelitis (or commonly called polio), a highly infectious viral disease that targets the spinal cord affecting mainly young kids. It results in paralysis of one or both lower extremities, thus one or both legs. It is debilitating and crippling in worst cases. For my friend Lyle, vaccination was too late.

With the unwavering support of her loving family, she vowed to be oblivious of what the world has to say about her. What mattered most was the fact that she stood by her Live and Let Live philosophy:  as long as she doesn’t hurt anyone, she has also the right to live her life like everyone else, no matter what.

Lyle is a graceful spirit loved by everyone she has come to touch the lives of.  She loves to have fun, and she’s never boring to be with. She tries to be there for her nieces and nephews, and she catered to the family business alongside her parents and other siblings.

She has the knack for business. Just recently, she branched out of the family business to set up her own niche in the same food industry with a franchise– and blessings– from her family. Her career keeps her busy, but she never fails to be there for those who need her.

Through sheer will power, happy disposition, and a resilient faith, she has managed to triumph over her handicap. That’s my friend Lyle.

WHERE HAS THE DASH (-) GONE?


       I have been reading a lot lately and I noticed that many posts, articles, essays and other good-reads had the dash missing where they should have been placed.

Between words- that is.

A dash is a punctuation mark that is similar to a hyphen or minus sign, but differs from both of these symbols primarily in length and function. The most common versions of the dash are the en dash (–) and the em dash (—), named for the length of a typeface‘s lower-case n and upper-case M respectively -Wikipedia.

There are four kinds of dashes used in the English language for writing.  What I particularly refer to here is the en dash. The short one that looks like a hyphen or a minus sign.  Beyond Way-Finding.  Best-Selling Status.  Over-the-counter medicines. Two-year course…

 I really think I crossed a boundary or two for doing this i.e. messing with other writers’ literary license.  But I’m just speaking my mind out here to defend the rights of the dash. It deserves to exist. To be used. To be properly used-where and when words need it.

Writing Badly # 70


Kudos to this awesome writer! Loved the story. Best of all,I can relate to this as I got a congenital defect on my left leg.

Write Badly, Daily

Painting of a TypewriterI was known in high school for my legs. I was not bright or athletic, but I had nice legs. Few of my former class mates can remember my name, but many of them can’t forget “the guy with the legs.” It’s been 18 years and so much has changed in my life, but not my legs. They’ve remained as they were.

So it didn’t surprise me very much when my girlfriend confronted me about it one night.

“If you love me,” she said. “If you really, really love me, you will grow hair on your legs.”

We were at an intersection waiting for the traffic light to turn green. Next to a tall building was a huge Svenson billboard.

“Babe?” I said.

“You heard me,” she said. She folded her arms across her chest and continued gazing outside the window.

“I love your legs just the way they are.”

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ABOUT ‘SPECIAL PERSONS ARE PEOPLE, TOO!’ BLOG


The Special Olympics showcased what special people can achieve. This blog showcases more of what they, or rather we– are and more.

special persons are people, too!

Special Persons are People, Too is a literary hub where everyone is welcome to interact with persons with congenital physical deformities or defects, give advice, offer opportunities, or just simply to give support and show they care.

Being provided a fantastic site you can call your own is simply irresistible.  Best of all, you can do whatever you want with it (for as long as you don’t go over the boundaries). It’s like winning the lottery;  a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that you feel you have to really take care of and make the best of.

Thanks to the kindness of all the staff at wordpress.com and the community and other outfits that support them. Words can never suffice to show our gratefulness for these selfless people. Without them, Special Persons are People, Too could not have come into existence.

People like me-bloggers, authors/writers, companies, associations, and other organizations geared towards sharing…

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FINANCIAL STABILITY: A MUST FOR ALL SENIOR CITIZENS (by Dr. Gary S. Sy in Gabay sa Kalusugan’s Health Page))


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Truth Hurts. Ugly Truth but TRUE. I am just sharing this email message I received from a dear friend. If you are 40 years old and above you really have to read and consider these realities of life. How to stay ‘safe’ at old age: (Remember only you can save yourself safely at old age). 1. Do not retire. If you’re over-aged, retire and get all the benefits but find another income-generating job or open a business that will keep you active physically and mentally. Travel and bond with true friends, play a sport, learn a new hobby and volunteer in your community or parish. Don’t loaf around. Your spouse will hate you because you’ve become a sloppy, listless bum with nothing good to say about the household and things that you never bothered about before. Solve crossword puzzles, play Scrabble, write your memoirs, and above all, read …this will keep you alert and keep Alzheimer’s at bay. 2. Live in your own place to enjoy independence, privacy and a solo life. If you move in with your children, your rank or degree of importance is reduced to that of a bed spacer who has no place of honor or, worse, like crumbling furniture merely displayed with no added value. Maybe, you have to ‘kowtow’ to conform to their own rules that are not kind, considerate or mindful of you? If you witness your children engaged in a war of will and wits with your grandchildren, whom will you side with? Will they even appreciate your arbitration? Remind your children that silence is not a sign of weakness; you are merely processing data that is taking longer to complete. 3. Hold on to your nest egg, bank deposits and assets. If you want to help your children, do give, but not to the extent that you wipe out your life’s earnings, singing heroically not a shirt on my back nor a penny to my name. Staying solvent and in the black is a good hedge against all kinds of tempests. You will sleep better, you will not be afraid to express your opinion and you will be confident about yourself. 4. Don’t believe your children’s promise to care for you when you grow old priorities change. Many children are not guilt- ridden or filled with a sense of moral obligation when the wife and offspring take top billing in their lives. There are still children who would consider it a privilege to show compassion, genuine love and deep concern for their parents but be warned that not all children think alike. 5. Expand your circle of friends to include young ones who will definitely outlive your old BFFs. Keep up with new inventions, trends, music and lifestyle including all the scams and schemes you should guard against. Remember that when you mix with the young, you also open a fresh avenue to channel your thoughts, experiences and values through so that the lessons you learned are not lost, forgotten or buried with you. 6. Be well groomed and smelling fresh of spring water all the time. There’s nothing more depressing than seeing people exhale when you walk by because you reek of baul (camphor chest) or lupa (dirt). Old age or bust, don’t look and smell like a corpse when you’re not one yet. 7. Do not meddle in the life of your children. If they ask for your counsel, give it, but be ready to accept that they may not take it. Their situations in life cannot be compared to the situations that you experienced in your life. The playing field has changed and they need to develop their own set of survival skills. If you raised them to be street smart, they can handle themselves in tough situations and be able to read people. Champion and encourage their dreams and desires but on their own terms. 8. Do not use old age as your shield and justification for turning grumpy. There’s nothing more annoying than an arrogant, old fool. Welcome each day as another chance to be kind and forgiving, to yourself and to others. 9. Listen to what others may say. Do not throw your weight around just because you are a septuagenarian or a nonagenarian. You are not a depository of knowledge. Even if the roles have been reversed, make growing old a fun-filled, pleasant experience for you and your brood. 10. Pray always and focus on your eternal life. You will definitely leave everything behind, a final journey detached from burden and care. Be more accepting that, sooner, not later, you will croak. Prepare your swan song with a humble and contrite heart. If you believe in a merciful and loving God, there is no need to strut like a star. Nobody is. Money – Your last power at old age ! If you are broke at old age, nobody, not even your children will come close to you. You are a parasite. Yes, Money buys you power when you needed it most at old age.

KYLA


I wrote this eons ago. Thanks for checking it out!

special persons are people, too!

I saw her on teevee today.
I almost thought, “how cruel God must be”.
I almost cried; seeing her was just like your heart was crushed.
Such fragile ‘thing’… It must be very hard for her mum…

Kyla was auditioning for a teevee show.

The show is the local equivalent of America’s Got Talent television program. She was auditioning! Before her turn to show-off, nobody would ever believe she was there for the screening. SCREENING!

Did you say, screening? Screening as in like auditioning? As in: a trial performance to determine suitability for a contest? A try-out? An elimination exercise?

Yes. And for a prestigious national television show, at that.

Because Kyla looked like she’s just a baby, you can never tell otherwise. Her mother carries her around. She doesn’t have the capacity or functionality to walk. Her legs couldn’t support her. All her extremities seemed very fragile, although her…

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